Posts Tagged ‘New York Giants’

Packernet’s Al, Still Unhinged

January 24, 2008

Our man from Packernet, Al, has responded to this post in which I criticized him for, among other things, comparing the Packers loss to the Giants to the Michael Vick killing dogs and erroneously accusing Mike McCarthy of distracting the team by putting his new contract before winning. It was all nonsense.

And there was also this postgame rant:

Brett, don’t go away mad, just go away. It is clear you can’t carry a team any longer, you are no Joe Montana, you are no John Elway, you are just a chucker who should have won more championships than you did. I’m done with the Packers and you should be too. Game over. Please do not respond to this entry. In fact, go away and leave me alone. No more to come…

As it turns out, there was more to come. Al wrote to us yesterday.

Does being a Packers’ fan mean that you can’t speak the truth? Do I have to only promote the positive and hide the negative? If that is what you want, don’t come to Packernet. We won’t miss you.

We won’t spend too much time him. You’ve read his rants, they don’t warrant much of a response. Allow me to point out, however, that we’re not opposed to criticism of the Packers. In fact, the top post on our site at the time he wrote was critical of Mike McCarthy for the gameplan against the Giants. But Al wasn’t speaking the truth. He was, among other things, likening a tough loss in a football game to the brutal torture of dogs. That, my friends, is unhinged, but it’s also pretty hilarious.

So we’ll keep visiting Packernet and we’ll keep the link up. I think we can all use a good laugh these days.

Giants Are Dirty (To Hell with New York Media, Part III)

January 17, 2008

These guys know how to gin up a controversy.

Paul Schwartz, a columnist for the New York Post, devoted an entire column today to lamenting the fact that the New York Giants have few externalities ginning them up for the game this Sunday. The Giants, he argued, need that kind of motivation to play at their best; they need a chip on their shoulder. The article was headlined: “No Chance in Hell.” The subhead: “Hey, Blue, Pin That on Your Bulletin Board.”

Schwartz wrote:

THE PACKERS probably won’t do it, won’t comply in sucker Cowboys fashion, won’t set a dumb trap for themselves by opening their mouths or escaping Green Bay to head to a warmer spot (Nome, Alaska, perhaps?) with their celebrity babes for a few days of R&R. They won’t rile up perpetually-riled Brandon Jacobs or give Plaxico Burress the desire to once again redecorate his locker or utter as much as a peep, which is all Antonio Pierce needs to sound the alarm (or air horn).

None of this works for the Giants. Mere underdog status isn’t enough. Their coach is being hailed as The Great Communicator and their quarterback is now The Younger Brother Who Could. No one is assailing their character, commitment or confidence. For a team that admittedly thrives on beat-downs and put-downs, there’s simply not enough here to whip them into an “I told you so” frenzy…

The best way to jump-start the Giants is to disrespect them, tell them, “No you can’t” when they think “Yes we can.” It’s for their own good.

What was that about no one assailing their character? If there’s no villain, make one up.

Our friend Greg Bedard had a perfectly reasonable article this morning noting that the New York Giants have a reputation for dirty play. That’s hardly a controversial thing to say. Anybody who watched the Week 2 games must remember Plaxico Burress’s late hit on A.J. Hawk, one of the more egregious late shots I saw all season. And the Sean O’Hara hit on Aaron Kampman that serves as the basis for much of Greg’s article was just as bad. The Giants did this all year long. And Bedard started his article by pointing out that Kampman didn’t want to talk smack. “Aaron Kampman didn’t want to talk about it Wednesday. He took the rather diplomatic approach of not providing the New York Giants with anything that could be deemed bulletin-board material.” The article quoted three other Packers saying that they were aware that the Giants like to take their shots and pledging not to be baited into fighting back.

It was a good, straightforward story, but otherwise unremarkable. In typical New York fashion, if the Giants need a controversy to get fired up, count on the media to do that. By day’s end, they had.

So then came this article in the New York Post. It was splashed across the front of the New York Post website under a banner “breaking news.” And the headline “Sean Says ‘We’re Not Dirty.’”

Once again, an opponent sent disparaging words hurtling toward the unsuspecting Giants. Last week, it was mouthy Cowboys receiver Patrick Crayton who conjured up Giants trash talking (that no one quite recalled) as proof they were either scared or not confident in their ability to win at Texas Stadium. The Giants took great delight in reminding Crayton of his boastful words after their 21-17 victory bounced the Cowboys from the playoffs.

The Giants sounded slightly amused that the Packers, three days before the game to determine which team gets to Super Bowl XLII, were worried about late hits and rough stuff.

Suddenly, in a quick turn that is hard to do if you’re anywhere other than New York, it wasn’t the Giants that are a dirty team, it was the Packers who were talking smack. Huh?

“If they want to talk, let ‘em talk,” said left tackle David Diehl. Umm, who was talking?

We’ll give former Packer Grey Ruegamer the last (very tasteless) word. “Any D-linemen calling offensive linemen dirty, that’s retarded. They take their shots, we take our shots. I’m not going to go home and get whiny about it.”

Good riddance.

UPDATE: Be sure to check out some of the reactions to Greg’s piece from Giants fan. He posted the publishable ones on the JS Online Packer blog. Hilarious.

UPDATE II: Tim Canavan, an AP sports writer, quotes Grey Ruegamer a little differently in this article. Did he change the quote to make it less offensive? If so, that’s offensive.

Green Bay Packers, Bad Luck?

January 15, 2008

To paraphrase the old country song, Rudy Giuliani might as well take bad luck because it’s better than no luck at all. At a campaign stop in Florida yesterday, the state where the former New York City mayor is betting his candidacy on a win, Giuliani refused to sign a Green Bay Packer hat given to him by a Packer fan.

Watch the video here.

Memo to Rudy: You already said you would support the Boston Red Sox after your New York Yankees were eliminated, something akin to cheering for Lucifer if you are a Yankee fan. Now, you’re offered a Packer hat to sign and you refuse? In Florida? The Packers are America’s team. If you were to somehow win Florida — less likely now that you may have lost that vote — showing your support for the Packers could have given you a huge boost heading into the February 5, 22-state primary. (It’s entirely possible the Packers will have gotten beaten decisively in the Super Bowl two days earlier, thus driving up the sympathy vote.)

If I’m you, at this point I start campaigning in a Cheesehead to start making amends. It’s your only shot.

A Deafening Silence…

November 19, 2007

Although they promised an update after suggesting this morning that a side-wager between Packer players may be the reason Adrian Peterson was injured last week, the guys at profootballtalk.com have gone silent. They’re liveblogging the game tonight but haven’t seen fit to mention the non-controversy or explain their obviously flawed reasoning on the issue. We’ve posted on it here and here.

Also, as far as we know, PFT never commented on this story from the New York Daily News, here.

The secret to the Giants’ devastating pass rush this season isn’t new defensive coordinator Steve Spagnuolo’s blitz schemes or an improved secondary. It is actually a pool in which each defensive end contributes money based on his salary, with the winner taking home the loot based on his production.
The pool has all the defensive ends talking trash and desperately trying to top one another in stats. So far, Osi Umenyiora is running away with the money.

And if the NFL “investigated,” as they are reportedly doing in this case, they did so very quietly. Is there a double-standard at work?


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